5 Healthy Approaches to Addressing Your Personal Challenges

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We all have them, don’t we? Some of us are too stubborn. Some of us struggle with time management. Some of us need to work on our finances. Some of us are too reactive. Some of us are too passive. Some of us are too people pleasing. Some of us are too self involved. Some of us are inconsistent. Some of us have a short fuse. Some of us are impatient. Some of us are overbearing. Some of us complain too much. Some of us take things too personally. We all have habits, mindsets, and behaviors that we struggle with and need to address. It’s called being human. Continue reading “5 Healthy Approaches to Addressing Your Personal Challenges”

5 Important Questions to Ask Yourself as You Reflect on Your Year

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Depending on the type of year you’ve had, it can be challenging to engage in deep reflection on what has transpired in your life over the last 365 days. There have been years where my lows have definitely outnumbered my highs, and all I’ve wanted to do was close the door on that year and forge ahead. During these stormy seasons, the last thing I wanted to was sit down and think about why things unfolded the way that they did. And then, there are years (like this one, for me!) where you genuinely feel like you’re soaring. You’ve got a handle on things, you’re in love with yourself and your life, and you now have peace about the dark and stormy seasons you’ve gone through, because you are experiencing the growth and prosperity that they propelled you into. Things are going so well for you that you honestly don’t feel the need to spend time reflecting; you just hope and pray that life continues to hand you lemons as you enter the new year. Continue reading “5 Important Questions to Ask Yourself as You Reflect on Your Year”

Learning to Love On You When the World Isn’t

It’s been a painful and challenging week. From stomaching the horrifying deaths of two unarmed Black men at the hands of white police officers, to watching or being among the protesters in Charlotte being teargassed, to being subjected to listening to the distorted, institutional biased media coverage, all while having to show up and be fully present at work and in our daily routines, I’ve straddled between feeling drained and distraught all week.

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The Problematic Assumptions About Powerful Black Women

Let me start by saying that I love the fact that there are dynamic, powerful, highly accomplished Black women being portrayed on TV shows like Scandal and Being Mary Jane. And, I absolutely love the fact that these shows were inspired, created and produced by Black women (Shonda Rhimes and Mara Brock-Akil). Characters like Olivia Pope and Mary Jane Paul are portrayed as complex, career-obsessed, power hungry, and at times, ruthless. Why? Because they know and are constantly reminded that they have to work twice as hard to get half as much. They know that for every one accomplishment, they’ll be greeted with 5 criticisms. They know that their merit and intellect doesn’t stand on its own or speak for itself–it has to be proven time and time again, and even after it is, it’ll still be called into question. I’ve talked previously in great depth about the pervasive influence of systemic racism in our society, so let me be crystal clear that the so-called complexes that powerful Black women have about their success is a direct result of the systems and structures put into place to ensure our subordinate position in society (especially in the workforce). That being said, let’s not act like powerful Black women are crazy for crazy’s sake. We are “crazy” because we are cognizant of the innumerable barriers to our success and have to work tirelessly not to internalize them; we are “crazy” because we have to work harder to be seen, respected, and considered an equal than any other demographic in the workforce; we are “crazy” because rather than receiving empathy, we receive rejection and judgement.

Continue reading “The Problematic Assumptions About Powerful Black Women”

3 Reasons Why Blackness is Magical

So, I’ve never bothered to explain the title of this blog, though it’s probably self-explanatory that #blackprofessionalmagic was inspired and derived from the #blackgirlmagic movement. #BlackGirlMagic celebrates the untouchable greatness of Black girls across the world. It acknowledges the inability of our unique beauty, intellect, and talents to be replicated  by any other group; it encourages us to walk in courageous boldness, no matter how hard society tries to tear us down; it reminds us that we were purposefully and intricately designed to inspire and impact those around us in exceptional, enviable ways. Let’s face it, y’all, there’s really nothing better than being a Black girl.

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5 Key Mindsets to Enhance Self-Love

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Self-love isn’t easy. Similarly to loving someone else, it takes time to truly understand the ins and outs of someone–even if that someone is you. So often, in our fast-paced society of over-involvement, we neglect to spend time with the one person who is guaranteed to be with you every day of your life–you. We pour energy into our jobs, our friends, our significant others, our parents, our siblings, our pets, but we forget about ourselves. We become consumed by what others think of us and how we are being perceived. As Black people, this is compounded by society’s mis-characterization of us–we are often portrayed as unruly, abrasive, and unlovable. Self-love takes time, dedication, and a willingness to experience discomfort. Here are a few critical mindsets to adopt to enhance your journey:

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The Paradox of Raising Black Kids in White Neighborhoods

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I was born in Delaware, raised between Pittsburgh and Cleveland, and now reside in Durham, North Carolina. I am the product of two incredibly hard-working, Black, first-generation college graduates, who paved their own paths in this world without inheriting anything except love and traditional Christian values. My parents worked tirelessly to ensure that my brother and I not only had every opportunity possible to succeed in life, but to also ensure that our lives were substantially more full and comfortable than theirs were.

Continue reading “The Paradox of Raising Black Kids in White Neighborhoods”